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Showing posts from February, 2015

Register for NCBA Cattlemens Webinar:
New Tools in Bull Selection
Understanding and Using Selection Indexes

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NCBA has recognized the changing face of selection in the seedstock industry. In order to help commercial producers make wiser selection decisions during the upcoming bull sales this spring, they are hosting a webinar at 7:00 pm CST on February 19th. Space is limited, so sign up soon. For those who can't catch the session live, it will be recorded and a link posted on the NCBA webpage.

The seminar will feature Dr. Dan Moser from the American Angus Association, Jack Ward from the American Hereford Association, and Dr. Wade Shafer from the American Simmental Association.

For more information and to register, visit the NCBA website.


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2015 Angus Convention to Host International Genomics Symposium

The American Angus Association® and Angus Genetics Inc. (AGI) will host the first-ever International Genomics Symposium as part of the 2015 Angus Means Business National Convention and Trade Show.

The event takes place Nov. 3 in Overland Park, Kan., and will provide cattle producers with cutting-edge information about advancements in genomics technology – and how these advances impact their businesses.

The symposium is sponsored by GeneSeek, a leading provider of comprehensive genomics solutions to the cattle industry, including the GeneSeek Genomic Profiler (GGP-HD).

“We are excited about the symposium and what it will mean for the cattle business,” says Dan Moser, AGI president. “Genomics is rapidly reshaping the way we produce livestock, and providing producers with the best information available will not only help us improve quality and consistency, but also make our industry more competitive.”

Genomics researcher and entrepreneur Richard Resnick (previously featured on this blog) wil…

Avoid the Headache: Properly Submitting DNA Samples
Breed Improvement Session
Angus Means Business National Convention

DNA sampling
Tonya Amen, AGI
During the second portion of the Breed Improvement session, Dr. Amen answered the question "How can we avoid sample failure when DNA testing animals?" She gave four points:

Have proper collectors on hand. Blood samples are preferred, as the process can be automated. Blood samples can also be archived, whereas tissue samples cannot be. Contact your DNA service provide or see the Angus website. Have samples properly identified. "You cannot invent your own collection system!" said Amen. A business card, airline barf bag, and other home-remedies won't work!Practice good sampling technique. Make sure you have a nickel sized spot that has soaked completely through the card. Do not send wet samples-mold will grow like crazy! Make sure samples dry overnight in a safe place (not the dash of your truck!).Package well. Padded envelopes work well.Consider shipping method. How long will the sample be in transit?

Staff at AGI have a mantra about bl…