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Hereford and Red Angus Heifers Recruited for Genomics Research

The University of Missouri is recruiting 2,500 Hereford heifers and 2,500 Red Angus heifers to participate in a heifer puberty and fertility genomic research project. Heifers should be registered Hereford, registered Red Angus, or commercial Hereford or Red Angus. Hereford x Red Angus crossbred heifers targeted for the Premium Red Baldy Program would also be a good fit for the research project. Producers must be willing to work with a trained veterinarian to collect the following data: ReproductiveTract Scores collected at a pre-breeding exam 30 to 45 days prior to the start of the breeding season. PelvicMeasurements (height and width) collected at the same pre-breeding exam 30 to 45 days prior to the start of the breeding season. Pregnancy Determination Using Ultrasound reporting fetal age in days. Ultrasound will need to occur no later than 90 days after the start of the breeding season. In addition, heifers must have known birth dates and have weights recorded eithe

Happy DNA Day!
Welcome to the genomic revolution

Happy DNA Day! Today we celebrate the publishing of the double helix structure of DNA by Watson and Crick, but we also celebrate the genomic revolution which is upon us. The genome is the collection of all the DNA in your body, or in your livestock's body, or any other living organism for that matter. Richard Resnick gave a great TED talk about the genomic revolution. While the decline in the cost of sequencing has slowed, scientists, including those in agriculture, continue to push the genomic revolution forward.










For those of you who worry this video is all about humans, steak is mentioned at 6:30 into the video and food production is mentioned at 7:00.

The genomic revolution will continue to impact the way we produce and consume our food. Astute livestock producers will put their "typewriters" in the closet and embrace the "computers and Ethernet" of genomic technologies.

Comments

Jared Decker said…
This editorial does a great job explaining that it was actually the work of 7 people who helped determine the structure of DNA. Editorial Raymond Gosling: the man who crystallized genes

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